Education

The Queen Elizabeth Parks Project


'CONNECTING PEOPLE AND WILDLIFE'

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Education

There are fourteen Ugandan and English schools involved in the Queen Elizabeth

Parks Project.

Some of these schools are involved in full partnerships, others simply involve the Project Team in cultural, environmental and citizenship aspects of the school curiculum.

One of the main ideas is to get Park Rangers visiting local schools.

 

The Project runs cluster meetings in both Uganda and England, it also organises training events and has overseen the donation and use of laptops and tablets which aid communication between UK and Ugandan schools.

Cluster Groups and Blogs

 

The Project runs cluster meetings in both Uganda and England, it also organises training events and has overseen the donation and use of laptops and tablets which aid communication between UK and Ugandan schools.

 

We would like to thank Denplan for orginally donating laptops and also Clanfield and Liss Junior schools in the UK for supporting the instalation of solar panels at their respective partner schools.

 

The Project also collects pens, pencils, exercise books and other items in support of our Ugandan Twinned Schools.

 

Key to the success of the Project is the communication via the twinned schools blog sites.

Click on the links right to discover more.

Led by local artist Philippa Adams, Clanfield Junior School in Hampshire involved pupils, teachers and parents in creating a giant mosaic celebrating their connection with Bukorwe Primary School which is in the south of the Queen Elizabeth National Park.

Katunguru Primary School pupils got involved in  local environmental project to clean up their local area.

 

They made a giant elephant sculpture of an elephant out of the plastic bottles they collected,

 

 A truly inspiring way to connect with wildlife.

Teaching About the Environment

 

 

The Project's Rangers and Teachers work hard to find innovative ideas and activites to engage young people in wildlife conservation, environmental and cultural issues.

The Conservation Cup

 

 

Teachers Adam Stanley of Liss Junior School and Yowasi Byaruhanga of Kafuro Primary school worked with the Tag Rugby Trust to create the Conservation Cup.

 

They use sport as a way of engaging young people in Wildlife.

 

Eight teams representing seven schools battled to become the champions of wildlife and win the conservation cup.

 

Between matches there was the opportunity to meet staff from the Queen Elizabeth National Park and hear about the work they undertake in managing wildlife.

 

The Conservation Cup has annual event with last year's event being support by CM Sports and included a football competition as well as a perdormance about conservation.

 

It is hoped that a UK version of the Conservation Cup will be held in 2019

Mweya Nursery School

The Queen Elizabeth Parks Project is keen to support the Mweya Nursery School, here we explain why.

 

Mweya is where  the Queen Elizabeth National Park's main tourism facilities are based. It is also home to many Rangers and other Park Staff.

 

Being very remote area there are few provisions for families.

 

This lack of provision means that  children are quite often sent away to school and are disadvantaged as they will not have attended any kind of pre-schooling.

 

The spliting up of families also has a negative impact on the moral of the staff.

 

In order to improve this situation some of the parents have started their own nursery school using one the Park's redundant buildings.

 

They all contribute towards the cost of employing a teacher and the educational resources. But this is a struggle, as the staff here are on very low wages and building needs much work

 

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A Registered Charity Number 1137413